Tag Archives: creative writing

Traipsing with Travel Writers Workshop March 5th

14 Feb

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An eclectic backpack of well-travelled writers will discuss the different forms of writing they produce from those adventures – and how you can use your own experiences to create original pieces of work.

Thu, March 5, 2020, 5:00 PM – 7:15 PM GMT Add to Calendar

Eldon Building, Middle Street, Portsmouth PO1 2DJ

 

Schedule

5.00 – 5.45pm: An interview with two of our celebrated travel writers.

6pm – 7.15pm: Themed readings from the collected writers and discussions about the various techniques used.

7.30pm – 9.00pm: Hands on workshop. Please book on the separate listing

Our speakers

Ben Aitken is the author of A Chip Shop in Poznan: My Unlikely Year in Poland, recounting a year spent working, travelling and integrating. Paul Ross called it ‘the funniest book of the year.’ Ben also wrote Dear Bill Bryson: Footnotes from a Small Island, featuring in The Guardian, The Times and on BBC Radio.

Amanda Garrie is in the final stages of a PhD in creative writing, where she’s writing a novel, at The University of Portsmouth. She was Portsmouth City Library and Archives Service Poet in Residence for 2019 and is a founder member of T’Articulation spoken word troupe. Much of her poetry and prose-fiction reflects the cultural curiosities discovered on her travels in Spain, Eastern Europe and India.

Mike Manson’s new novel, Down in Demerara, concerns an Englishman who is plucked from his humdrum job and dispatched to the forbidden rainforest of Guyana on a mysterious assignment. Fay Weldon calls the book ‘a fast-moving and wonderfully funny (I laughed aloud a lot) vigorous and intelligent tale of an innocent abroad.’

Richard Peirce, a co-founder of T’Articulation, is well-known on the local spoken-word circuit. His poetry, often connecting emotionally with the people, landscapes and situations, of his travels in the Philippines, Russia and Africa, has been published in a number of anthologies.

Tom Sykes is the author of The Realm of the Punisher: Travels in Duterte’s Philippines which garnered positive reviews in the Times Literary Supplement and the London Magazine. Tom is also the author of Ivory Coast: The Bradt Guide and his travel journalism has appeared in The Telegraph, Private Eye, New Statesman, New African, The Scotsman and many other titles.

Tickets are free but you will have to book them in advance here.

A three part experience in collaboration with Star & Crescent, T’Articulation and the University of Portsmouth.

Interview in The Eldon Review

4 Feb

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My interview with Elizabeth Palmer for The Eldon Review, the University of Portsmouth’s creative writing blog is now live. It’s called ‘Dangerous Segues’ and starts a little bit like this:

Elizabeth Palmer talks to Dr Tom Sykes, Deputy Course Leader for undergraduate creative writing degrees at the University of Portsmouth, about history, reportage, dangerous destinations and how we might define creative writing.

Elizabeth Palmer: Why did you decide to become a creative writing lecturer?

Tom Sykes: About ten years ago when I was working as a freelance writer, I thought I might have some useful ideas that I could pass on to others. I’d always done a lot of thinking about my own creative processes and ‘the craft’ in general. I started a PhD at Goldsmiths, University of London with the expectation that I probably wouldn’t get any teaching work until I’d completed the course. But about a year into the PhD, the University of Portsmouth hired me, I think on the strength of my publication record. At that time I was living in Bristol, although I’d grown up in the Pompey area so it seemed fate was drawing me back to this part of the world.

EP: Why did you choose creative writing in particular and not English literature?

TS: My first degree was in English at the University of East Anglia. At that time, UEA was one of the few UK universities that had a creative writing programme, but now you’ll find them everywhere. As part of my studies I was able to take units in journalism and prose fiction writing, which I enjoyed and did pretty well in. Ten years later, when I was applying for PhDs, I was in two minds because I had ideas for dissertations in both creative writing and English. As it happened, I was able to sort of combine the two disciplines at Goldsmiths.

Read the rest of the piece here. 

Press and Social Media Masterclass for Writers

22 May

Join S&C editors Tom Sykes and Sarah Cheverton to learn how to:

  • Get your fiction and journalism published in the press (and get paid for it!)
  • Maximise your research by using it across different media platforms
  • Find new audiences & readers for your books by building followers through engagement with shorter pieces
  • Build your writer’s profile online
  • Use social media to boost your writing career
  • Understand which platforms are best for you
  • Avoid time drains and other pitfalls

Sunday 25th June 2017
9.30am-4.00pm
Eldon Building foyer, Winston Churchill Avenue, Portsmouth University, Portsmouth PO1 2ST

Booking and more information here.

Sarah Cheverton is Editor-in-Chief of local news and commentary site Star
& Crescent. She is also Writer-in-Residence for the voluntary sector
organisation Aurora New Dawn, as well as a writer, lover of Portsmouth and
blogging contributor for Huffington Post UK.

Tom Sykes is a widely published writer, Portsmouth University senior
lecturer and Co-editor of Star & Crescent. He has 12 years of professional writing experience including publications in The Telegraph, New Statesman, The Scotsman, Private Eye and New Internationalist.

Brought to you in association with New Writing South, Portsmouth Writers’ Hub, Star & Crescent and the School of Media and Performing Arts, Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries, University of Portsmouth.

www.tomgsykes.co.uk: 2012 in Review

15 Jan

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

600 people reached the top of Mt. Everest in 2012. This blog got about 3,100 views in 2012. If every person who reached the top of Mt. Everest viewed this blog, it would have taken 5 years to get that many views.

Click here to see the complete report.